R. GAPPER PRIZES

The Society is pleased to confer the R. Gapper prizes upon scholarly work of outstanding merit, quality and value in the field of French and Francophone studies. Three separate prizes are awarded each year to work by undergraduates, postgraduates, and established researchers. Prizewinners must be based at an institution in the United Kingdom or Ireland.

 


The winners of the most recent Gapper Prize contests can be accessed here.


 


R. Gapper Undergraduate Essay Prize

A prize will be awarded by the Society for an essay written by an undergraduate in English or in French, of between 2000 and 5000 words, on any subject within the broader scope of French studies. The award includes a cash prize of £250.

Details available here.

Applications must be accompanied by an official coversheet, supplied to Departments by the Society for French studies or available to download here.

Previous winners visible here.

R. Gapper Postgraduate Essay Prize

A prize will be awarded by the Society for an essay written by a postgraduate in English or French, of fewer than 6000 words, on any subject within the scope of French studies. The award includes a cash prize of £750. The deadline for the 2016 competition is 31 October 2016.

Details available here.

Applications must be accompanied by an official coversheet, supplied to Departments by the Society for French Studies or else available here.

Previous winners visible here.

R. Gapper Book Prize

A prize will be awarded by the Society for a book published in the field of French studies, appearing for the first time in the previous calendar year. The award commends books of critical and scholarly distinction which have a clear impact on the wider critical debate. It includes a cash prize of £2000.

Details available here.

Previous winners visible here.



The Malcolm Bowie Prize

The Malcolm Bowie Prize is awarded annually for the best article in any area of French Studies published by an early career researcher, defined for the 2016 Prize as a scholar who received their PhD in or after 2011 but before the end of 2016. The scholar must either have been registered for the PhD or worked since then in a Department of French/Modern Languages, or equivalent. Articles may be published anywhere in the world, but must have been written in French or English. Details available here.